Select filters

Case Study Captain Damian Cresp

Case Study - Capt D Cresp / 11 February 2016

PROFILE

Name Captain Damian Cresp
Nationality Australian
Age 60
Current Location Victoria
MBF Benefits Refund of Contributions

 

AVIATION CAREER

My flying training commenced in May 1978 at a flying school in Cessnock, NSW. After obtaining my Commercial Licence through this flying school, it was off to Mt Isa where my first job was flying a Cessna 206 to cattle stations in NT and North QLD. From there it was back to Melbourne in September 1981 to add a Class 1 instrument rating to my qualifications.
In November 1981, I commenced my first airline job with Murray Valley Airlines (MVA) based in Mildura, Victoria. It was a great honour to be selected and qualified as the Flight Operations Manager and Chief Pilot in November 1986, a position I held for 16 years. Later, MVA became Sunstate Airlines (Mildura) which was subsequently bought by Australian Airlines (TAA). The airline’s name was changed to Southern Australia Airlines in 1989 and was part of the Australian Airlines regional group along with Sunstate QLD and Eastern NSW. In the early 90’s, Australian Airlines was sold to Qantas and the three sister airlines became the Qantas Regional Group. After a period of 21 years with MVA/Sunstate/Southern, that part of my career ended when in October 2002 the airline was “merged” into Eastern. I resigned and took a redundancy rather than work for Eastern. After a short break, I joined Virgin in February 2003 as a B737 First Officer and upgraded to Captain March 2005. In February 2015, it became time to hang up the wings. The days were too long and the body was struggling. I retired from flying after a wonderful career in which I worked with and met so many fantastic people. At the age of 27 I joined the MBF and remained a member until my retirement, a period of over 30 years.

 

WHAT WAS YOUR EXPERIENCE LIKE WITH THE MBF THROUGHOUT YOUR CAREER?

My dealings with the MBF over the years have been a pleasant experience. Any queries were always answered promptly providing good information for decision making with respect to this necessary cover. The staff has always been courteous and very knowledgeable. The fund has matured over the years in its ability to change with the times, particularly in the area of ageing pilots. The benefits improved greatly as the years went past.

 

WHY IS LOSS OF LICENCE COVER IMPORTANT?

Loss of licence cover is very necessary to provide a peace of mind should you be overcome by a medical condition that disallows you to carry out the privileges of your pilot’s licence. Medical events can present themselves without warning.
Fortunately, I have never had to use the Fund due to medical issues, but was close. This occurred when lifting my nav bag from behind my seat when leaving the aircraft, I tore a bicep tendon. In this circumstance I was covered by WorkCover and my downtime was reasonably short. If there had been any complications and the time extended, or if I had not injured myself at work, it was pleasing to know the added pressure of total loss of income was not a concern because of the MBF.

 

IS THERE ANYTHING ELSE PILOTS SHOULD KNOW ABOUT MBF LOSS OF LICENCE PROTECTION?

We all consider ourselves bullet proof and, “it won’t happen to me”. Well it can and it will. You need to consider how you and your family will survive and maintain a lifestyle if you are unable to earn the money you have been accustomed to. The MBF must be a necessary part of your investment plan, a plan for yourself and your future and the future of your family.

 

Congratulations on your retirement Captain Damian Cresp!